Overview

A range of non-UQ copyright materials may be supplied to students for educational purposes. It is essential that material supplied complies with UQ's statutory and commercial licences. The following is a summary of these rules. If you need specific help, give us a call. 

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Providing learning materials in hardcopy form or non-online electronic form (e.g. CD)

a. From hardcopy source

  • One chapter or 10% of the pages of a book, whichever is the greater.
  • One article from an issue of a journal, or two or more where they are on the same topic – i.e. a single sub-topic narrower than the subject breadth of the journal.
  • Photographs (which are not incidentally on a copied page of text – i.e. are being supplied in their own right) so long as they are not separately commercially available.
  • Unpublished works - permission must be sought from the copyright owner.

b. From online source

  • Many licensed e-journals and databases subscribed to by the Library do not permit inclusion of print-outs in, for example, hardcopy course readers. Please consult the course reader quick guide.
  • Material openly available on the web from non-licensed sources can be used in limited quantities:
    • No more than 10% of the words or pages of a website - note: separately published copyright works made available through a website - e.g. reports – are treated as individual works and subject to the chapter or 10% rule in most cases. If in doubt, consult Tom Joyce.
    • Images where they are not separately commercially available in electronic form.

Providing learning materials online

a. From hardcopy source

  • The quantities are the same as may be supplied in hard copy form, but the amounts are not cumulative – i.e. the quantities are the total amount that may be supplied to a class of students in an individual subject using either or both means of delivery.
  • Scanned book chapter material must only be made available via the Library’s electronic reserve and not placed online directly through Blackboard or any other means.
  • It is highly recommended that scanned hardcopy journal material be placed online through the library’s electronic reserve, although it is not compulsory. Where such material is made available directly from Blackboard, the lecturer placing it online must ensure it is accompanied by the Part VB statutory warning:

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA Copyright Regulations 1969
WARNING

This material has been copied and communicated to you by or on behalf of The University of Queensland pursuant to Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968 (the Act).

The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act. Any further copying or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act.

Do not remove this notice.

b. From Online Source

  • Licensed online journals and databases in most cases do not permit content to be copied and made separately available online. You will usually be required to link to the publisher’s repository. Please see: http://www.library.uq.edu.au/copyright/licencecopying.html
  • Material available from non-licensed sources on the web should be linked to wherever possible, but may be copied in limited quantities and made available directly from, for example, a Blackboard site. For example:
    • No more than 10% of the words or pages of a website - note: separately published copyright works made available through a website - e.g. reports – are treated as individual works and subject to the chapter or 10% rule in most cases. If in doubt, consult Tom Joyce.
    • Images where they are not separately commercially available in electronic form.

Broadcasts of TV and radio

TV and radio broadcasts are routinely copied by the Library and these can be made available for teaching in a variety of way – e.g. showing in class, inclusion in whole or part on DVD or CD and by being made available for viewing online through a UQ Blackboard website.

Showing or playing audiovisual works in class

Commercially purchased audiovisual material – e.g. films and music may be played in classroom settings.

Music

In addition to being able to play music in a classroom setting – as permitted by the Copyright Act – it is possible in limited circumstances to provide copies or streamed versions of commercial music recordings to students for educational and classroom-related activities.

Given the unusual records and marking requirements of the licence, please contact Tom Joyce, University Copyright and Library Lawyer, before making such use of musical works.

Print version

Copyright for Teaching Quick Guide (PDF, 91 KB)